MASTERSTUDIOS at KULeuven

campus Sint-Lucas Ghent / Brussels

Deze website stelt je in staat om een overzicht te krijgen van de diverse masterstudio’s en masterproeven die we in de faculteit organiseren.

(De spelregels kan je hier vinden.)

Wil je de masterstudio’s en masterproeven stap voor stap verkennen, volg dan deze link.

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Infrastructures as a Tool to Rethink the City

The design studio “maib24 2018-2019” tutored by Cecilia Chiappini focuses on the value of infrastructures as tools to explore the city, as they tend to gather qualities that give space to manifestations of urbanity and collectivity, emergent appropriations and unexpected processes. The aim is to explore those qualities and to use them in design, as developing alternative urban models that questions the dialects between technical and social assemblages.

During an intensive research-design studio, students will discuss conceptual issues, develop and test explorative tools to address the topic, especially looking at “spatial configurations, marks of human presence and voices” around infrastructures;1 deploying a “learning from…” approach. The students will produce an architectural-urban design-case based on their enquiries on a specific location. Based on their explorations on-site, they will define the users and programmes, areas and scope of intervention. Infrastructures as urban spaces at different scales are to be at the core of the proposals. This semester’s site is the transformation process of Glories Square in Barcelona, Spain. The students will go on a trip to the city during the first weeks of the semester and will develop their research and design cases at the campus Sint-Lucas, Brussels during the entire semester.

1. As developed in close relation with the tutor’s PhD-research on Infrastructures under Transformation as Spaces of Collectivities”
2. Inspired by Learning from Las Vegas and Made in Tokyo. See References.

PD-r/ADO, Engendering Flanders Landscape – urban living

When in The Housing Question Engels was striving for a definitive solution to the housing question, he was explicitly referring to utopian models which proposed the dissolution of the antithesis between town and country. The housing question, which is even more pressing today, cannot be solved by palliative solutions. If we do not go beyond the understanding of the territory as divided between the city and the countryside, or of domestic space as divided between shelter and production, of proprietor logics versus commons, we can expect the housing question to continue presenting challenges of accessibility and affordability for the decades to come. The studio Homes for Flanders further develops a research path initiated during the current academic year (2017-18) and centered on the problem of housing and domestic space, with a specific focus on both Flanders and Brussels.
The research is part and the second step of a longer trajectory (ADO project) that will run for two more years and will culminate in a publication and exhibition. While the starting point of the research is the need for a large amount of new living units resulting from the changing demographic and socio-economic conditions of this part of Europe (it is foreseen that 300.000 housing units need to be built by 2030 in Flanders), the specific focus of this year’s studio is property and the idea that new forms of ownership should be based on the notion of the ‘common’, thus bypassing the traditional dialectic relationship between public and private.

While this notion has been extensively studied by different disciplines, acquiring new impetus in the recent years, its application to the field of architecture is mostly limited and confined to the study of the urban common, the organization and management of territorial resources and of their consequent spatial implications. Applications to the field of housing are mostly limited and concerned exclusively with the development of alternative models of urban dwellings such as ‘co-housing’ and ‘co-living’. The studio will explore the possibility of deploying the logics of alternative forms of ownership in urban, suburban and rural territories not simply to develop new forms of communality among inhabitants, but also as the step to trigger new forms of production, local subsistence and ultimately the architectural forms of a new domestic space.

Infrastructures as a Tool to Explore the City
The design studio “maib14 2018-2019” tutored by Cecilia Chiappini focuses on the value of infrastruc- tures as tools to explore the city, as they tend to gather qualities that give space to manifestations of urban- ity and collectivity, emergent appropriations and unexpected processes. The aim is to explore those quali- ties and to use them in design, as developing alternative urban models that questions the dialects between technical and a social assemblages.
During an intensive research-design studio, students will discuss conceptual issues, develop and test ex- plorative tools to address the topic, especially looking at “spatial configurations, marks of human presence and voices” around infrastructures;1 deploying a “learning from…” approach.2 The students will produce an architectural-urban design-case based on their enquiries on a specific location. Based on their explora- tions on-site, they will define the users and programmes, areas and scope of intervention. Infrastructures as urban spaces at different scales are to be at the core of the proposals. This semester’s site is the network of highways known as “The Round”, around Barcelona, Spain, particularly focusing on the North-East Ac- cess. The students will go on a trip to the city during the first weeks of the semester, and will develop their research and design cases at the campus Sint-Lucas, Brussels during the entire semester. During the trip, students will participate at the workshop on The Rounds, a major academic event.
1. As developed in close relation with the tutor’s PhD-research on Infrastructures under Transformation as Spaces of Collectivities”
2. Inspired by Learning from Las Vegas and Made in Tokyo. See References.

PD-r/ADO, Engendering Flanders Landscape – urban living

When in The Housing Question Engels was striving for a definitive solution to the housing question, he was explicitly referring to utopian models which proposed the dissolution of the antithesis between town and country. The housing question, which is even more pressing today, cannot be solved by palliative solutions. If we do not go beyond the understanding of the territory as divided between the city and the countryside, or of domestic space as divided between shelter and production, of proprietor logics versus commons, we can expect the housing question to continue presenting challenges of accessibility and affordability for the decades to come. The studio Homes for Flanders further develops a research path initiated during the current academic year (2017-18) and centered on the problem of housing and domestic space, with a specific focus on both Flanders and Brussels.
The research is part and the second step of a longer trajectory (ADO project) that will run for two more years and will culminate in a publication and exhibition. While the starting point of the research is the need for a large amount of new living units resulting from the changing demographic and socio-economic conditions of this part of Europe (it is foreseen that 300.000 housing units need to be built by 2030 in Flanders), the specific focus of this year’s studio is property and the idea that new forms of ownership should be based on the notion of the ‘common’, thus bypassing the traditional dialectic relationship between public and private.

While this notion has been extensively studied by different disciplines, acquiring new impetus in the recent years, its application to the field of architecture is mostly limited and confined to the study of the urban common, the organization and management of territorial resources and of their consequent spatial implications. Applications to the field of housing are mostly limited and concerned exclusively with the development of alternative models of urban dwellings such as ‘co-housing’ and ‘co-living’. The studio will explore the possibility of deploying the logics of alternative forms of ownership in urban, suburban and rural territories not simply to develop new forms of communality among inhabitants, but also as the step to trigger new forms of production, local subsistence and ultimately the architectural forms of a new domestic space.