Heal the City

Heal the City – Healing Buildings for the Circular City

RbD/ADO, limited resources, re-use and integration

Keywords:

Limited resources, re-use and integration

Objectives:

COMMODITY SCARCITY IS ONE THE MOST PRESSING CHALLENGES OF OUR TIME. THE ANSWER? DISCARD LINEAR THINKING AND EMBRACE THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY.

 We live in an era where future exhaustion of fossil fuels and much needed commodities is an accepted reality. At the same time, waste

management puts an ever-growing strain on our environment. Rather than perceiving waste as a burden, we should look into its wide variety of useful properties, such as building materials from which new and alternative products can be created. The Circular City is where we manage waste, commodities and energy in smarter and more efficient ways. What can we expect from a circular approach? Less pressure on our environment, new business models, innovative designs and new alliances and cooperation between different stakeholders.

from “cities in transition – New Europe”

http://ilkka.halso.net

What’s happening? Has nature been evacuated to await better times, or has it been simplified into merchandise and absurd tableaux? I’m looking into the future. I don’t like what I see. Ilkka Halso

Content: program and theme

Together we create the city of tomorrow, starting today!

Waste, water, materials, and energy: these are the essential ingredients of any urban environment. And yet, as cities become increasingly popular places to live, we have lost sight of these important vectors of our urban ecosystems. How can we create a truly sustainable city that takes into account not only how people live, but also what they produce, consume, reuse, and waste?

Due to their environmental impact, cities play a crucial role in the transition towards sustainable societies. Despite the fact that they occupy only 3% of the global terrestrial surface, cities house more than half of the world’s population, consume 7% of its natural resources, and are directly and indirectly responsible for 60 to 80% of global greenhouse gas emissions (UNEP, 2012). The urban environment thus acts as a nexus of material flows and nodes for energy, water, consumption and production. Cities are key leverage points that demand our focus if we are to accelerate the necessary transition to circular and sustainable systems, both locally and globally.

Learn how to connect urban material, water, and energy flows to build a truly sustainable city with sustainable and circular buildings.

Read more on http://internationalmasterofarchitecture.be/2018-19-int-ma-master-dissertation-presentations-june-5-6/

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